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Highlands Elementary School

Public | K-5 | 597 students

 

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Last modified
Community Rating

4 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
No new ratings
2013:
Based on 2 ratings
2012:
Based on 1 rating
2011:
No new ratings

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9 reviews of this school


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Posted September 6, 2013

When our children went to Highlands their experience was very good, but not perfect. There were many excellent, life-changing teachers and a few clunkers. As with most districts, 203 gives more resources to special ed children than gifted. I would have liked more opportunities for my children in that area. However, I think one key measure of a school is how well students do in life later. My three children look back on this school has having given them a wonderful start on life. I highly recommend it and feel very fortunate that we landed there.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted February 2, 2013

I went to Highlands Elementary from 2003 to 2009. I can honestly say I had an OUTSTANDING childhood here at Highlands. The teachers are top notch, and there are several extracurricular opportunities offered. If I could do elementary school all over again, I would because this school is truly amazing. My parents originally planned to send me to a private school, but they were so impressed with Highlands and Kennedy Junior High they decided to let me go to public schools. If you want your kid to have an excellent education, stay in CUSD 203. It's great here, I promise.


Posted August 22, 2012

We moved to Naperville from Ohio last year. My son, who entered 2nd grade last fall, has an IEP. I received a phone call from the principal before we even moved here. She asked a lot of questions and was genuinely interested in how we could make this a smooth and pleasant transition. Once he started school I was contacted about the IEP meeting and met with about 8 school personnel. All of them were very excited to help my son succeed. The kids at this school are smart and have been very nice. My son's teachers are phenomenal and he really doesn't mind going to school. There are so many opportunities here and I just can't say enough wonderful things about Highlands or about the CUSD 203 administration. I would highly recommend this school to anyone.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 6, 2010

The classroom teachers are wonderful. The test scores are high. Our sons really enjoyed the sports program. Our problem, however, was that one of our sons qualified for an IEP (Individualized Education Program). It was not followed on a consistent basis despite our repeated pleas and meetings. We transferred our sons out of the Naperville School District and into a private school.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 28, 2009

A job transfer moved us back to Chicago last year, and Naperville sees many former-Chicagoans like us who have chosen Highlands ES in Dist 203 for its excellent school ranking. Highlands is welcoming of new families and volunteers. The school is locked and secure. The daily curriculum is progressive, differentiating for all levels of learners. Extra-curriculars abound even for the primary grades, including Spanish/Chinese; PE games; book club, math games and science fair nights. The music and art teachers have inspired my daughter to want to take lessons outside of school. We are thrilled with our decision to be at Highlands and are proud to live in Naperville, a community that makes education a priority.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 3, 2008

This school is excellent in many ways. If test scores are critical, its students' scores are great. But, test scores are not everything. Unfortunately, the school is not at all accepting of individual differences in learning styles. Some children will do well in this environment. Others will be discouraged and become less curious and interested in learning. There were some outstanding teachers at the school, although some young, inexperienced teachers in the early grades left a negative impression. Naperville is a great town in many ways, but it is also a bit like 'Stepford' and this school fit in perfectly. The school's music program was very good, yet there was limited exposure to music and art (apart from parent lectures on artists) and, given its proximity to Chicago, there could have been a much stronger cultural program. After school enrichment options were limited. Overall, though, positives far outweigh negatives.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 10, 2007

My daughter has attended Highlands for the past 2 years. The teachers are top notch and there are many opportunities for parental involvement (with a very high level of participaiton). The school's music teacher is exceptional and there are a fair number of extracurricular activities. Naperville is a great town and Highlands is truly an extraordinary school.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 8, 2006

Although the overall test scores are quite high there are some issues. The security is lax. The special education is short on teachers thus not allowing for proper help for all needs. The arts and music program is good. The building is inviting.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 9, 2005

I attended Scott Elementary and this school and remember the wonderful support provided by the principal. He was often walking the halls and greeting children or stopping to talk. The 'Jelly Bean Days' at the end of the year were very memorable and the playground one of the best around.
—Submitted by a former student


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.
Math

The state average for Math was 55% in 2013.

2013

 
 
90%

2012

 
 
98%

2011

 
 
100%

2010

 
 
99%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
88%

2012

 
 
96%

2011

 
 
98%

2010

 
 
98%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 60% in 2013.

2013

 
 
91%

2012

 
 
98%

2011

 
 
98%

2010

 
 
100%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
92%

2012

 
 
98%

2011

 
 
98%

2010

 
 
100%
Science

The state average for Science was 81% in 2013.

2013

 
 
93%

2012

 
 
99%

2011

 
 
98%

2010

 
 
98%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
96%

2012

 
 
98%

2011

 
 
98%

2010

 
 
96%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
94%

2012

 
 
98%

2011

 
 
98%

2010

 
 
94%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

All Students90%
Female90%
Male90%
Blackn/a
Asian100%
Hispanic91%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White89%
Low incomen/a
Non-low income91%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities92%
English language learnersn/a

Reading

All Students88%
Female96%
Male83%
Blackn/a
Asian96%
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White88%
Low incomen/a
Non-low income89%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities93%
English language learnersn/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

The different student groups are identified by the Illinois State Board of Education. If there are a small number of students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

All Students91%
Female88%
Male93%
Blackn/a
Asian96%
Hispanicn/a
Multiracial92%
Native Americann/a
White89%
Low incomen/a
Non-low income92%
Students with disabilities (IEP)58%
Students without disabilities94%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students92%
Female90%
Male95%
Blackn/a
Asian100%
Hispanicn/a
Multiracial100%
Native Americann/a
White90%
Low incomen/a
Non-low income96%
Students with disabilities (IEP)58%
Students without disabilities96%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a

Science

All Students93%
Female95%
Male92%
Blackn/a
Asian96%
Hispanicn/a
Multiracial100%
Native Americann/a
White91%
Low incomen/a
Non-low income94%
Students with disabilities (IEP)67%
Students without disabilities96%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

The different student groups are identified by the Illinois State Board of Education. If there are a small number of students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

All Students96%
Female96%
Male96%
Blackn/a
Asian96%
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
White97%
Low incomen/a
Non-low income96%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities97%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students94%
Female98%
Male90%
Blackn/a
Asian100%
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
White92%
Low incomen/a
Non-low income95%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities95%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

The different student groups are identified by the Illinois State Board of Education. If there are a small number of students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

What is the GreatSchools Rating?

The GreatSchools rating is a simple tool for parents to compare schools based on test scores, student academic growth, and college readiness. It compares schools across the state, where the highest rated schools in the state are designated as “Above Average” and the lowest “Below Average.” It is designed to be a starting point to help parents make baseline comparisons. We always advise parents to visit the school and consider other information on school performance and programs, as well as consider their child's and family's needs as part of the school selection process.

 
Above average

Test score rating
Student growth rating

1-3 Below Average

4-7 Average

8-10 Above Average

 

How schools in the state rate:

26%
of schools in the state are Below average
46%
of schools in the state are Average
28%
of schools in the state are Above average

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

The graphs below compare this school's results in each area to other schools in the district and state.

Test score rating 20131What's this?

Test score rating examines how students at this school performed on standardized tests compared with other schools in the state.

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District
State
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9
10

Student growth rating 20132What's this?

Student growth rating measures whether students at this school are making academic progress over time. Specifically, the rating looks at how much progress individual students have made on reading and math assessments during the past year or more.

Close
This school
District
State
1
2
3
4
5
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8
9
10

Math growth at this school

Above average

Reading growth at this school

Above average


1 Test scores are based on 2012-13 ISAT results from the state of Illinois.

2 This rating is based on 2012-13 value table growth scores from the state of Illinois.

Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school State average
White 71% 51%
Asian or Asian/Pacific Islander 17% 4%
Hispanic 6% 24%
Two or more races 5% 3%
Black 1% 18%
American Indian/Alaska Native 0% 0%
Hawaiian Native/Pacific Islander 0% 0%
Source: NCES, 2011-2012

Oops! We currently do not have any teacher information for this school. We rely on the state Department of Education, the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES), and in some cases school administrators such as registrars and principals for this data.

What makes a great teacher? Study after study shows the single most important factor determining the quality of the education a child receives is the quality of his teacher. Here are some characteristics to look for »

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525 South Brainard Street
Naperville, IL 60540
Website: Click here
Phone: (630) 420-6335

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